Media release checklist – the 20 ‘must haves’

The headline is catchy. The first sentence contains the story angle. The first sentence does not reference the name of a person or organisation. The first 2–3 sentences answer who, what, where, why, when and how. The first paragraph is bright, direct, simple and...

Controlling an interview

When you are preparing for an interview, it may help to remind yourself of the different priorities of researchers and journalists: Researchers work with accuracy, detail, prudence, incremental developments, robust methodologies and peer review. Journalists work with...

Gaining media coverage at scientific events

Journalists are always on the lookout for a good story. Conferences, symposia and other events usually have at least one newsworthy story or speaker. By briefing journalists in advance of the event and working with them during the event, you can maximise the...

Dealing with difficult media interviews

‘Bad news’ stories about difficult or contentious subjects should be carefully planned and released in the same way as ‘good news’ stories. Respond to the issue quickly and credibly. Control the agenda so your message gets out, not the journalist’s ideas or...

Attracting the media and keeping them interested – the 7 Ps

Preparation You need a media strategy that clearly identifies: the people you want to reach what you want to achieve from the media coverage the stories you want to get out via the media. People You need someone for the media to interview – the ‘talent’...